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Pop-Punk Band Yellowcard Continues its Lawsuit Against Juice WRLD for Unauthorized Sampling Despite his Tragic Death

18 Dec

Yellowcard‘s $15 million lawsuit against Juice WRLD will continue even after the rapper’s death.

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Yellowcard claims that Juice illegally sampled elements of their 2006 song, “Holly Wood Died” for his breakout, Nick Mira-produced 2017 single, “Lucid Dreams,” which has been certified six-times platinum. 

The case had been put on hold after Juice WRLD died earlier this month, but as newly obtained court documents  reveal the case will continue. However, the date for at least one part of this case has just been changed.

Yesterday, the pop-punk band filed a motion to extend the amount of time parties for Juice Wrld and his co-defendants Taz Taylor, Nick Mira, and the two labels Juice’s is signed to—Grade A Productions and Interscope Records—have to respond to the complaint filed against them. The original due date for the defendants’ response to the lawsuit was Dec. 9, but now they have until Feb. 4, 2020.

Speaking to Digital Music News after the death of Juice, Richard Busch, who is representing Yellowcard in the case, says the group put the litigation for the case on hold after Juice Wrld died on Dec. 8. The rapper suffered seizures at the Chicago Midway International Airport. Juice died after allegedly ingesting several Percocet pills in order to hide them from authorities as they searched through luggage containing 70 pounds of weed and six bottles of liquid prescription codeine cough syrup. At the time, Busch said the group wanted time to “digest” news of Juice’s death.

In October, Yellowcard members Peter Mosley, Ryan Key, Sean Wellman-Mackin and Longineu Parson claimed that Juice illegally sampled elements of their 2006 song, “Holly Wood Died” for his breakout, Nick Mira-produced 2017 single, “Lucid Dreams,” which has been certified six-times platinum.

 

Fat Joe Sued for Copyright Infringement and His Insurance Company Refuses to Back Him Up

10 Dec

Bronx born rapper and CEO of Terror Squad, Fat Joe  is named in a copyright infringement lawsuit related to the 2016 double-platinum single “All the Way Up.” 

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Fat Joe poses with Wendy Williams, Dec. 10, 2019 after appearing on her show where he discussed his show “Family Ties” and used the platform to condemn the glorification of pill popping in the wake of the death of fellow rapper Juice Wrld.

Unfortunately, his personal liability insurer, Homeland Insurance Co. of New York has told a New York federal court it does not have to cover the rapper Fat Joe in a copyright infringement lawsuit related to the 2016 double-platinum single “All the Way Up,” as the suit doesn’t fall under their agreement.Fat Joe’s smash hit was shared with French Montana.

The policy owned by Joseph Cartagena Fat Joe and his company Sneaker Addict Touring LLC doesn’t cover the lawsuit filed by rapper Fly Havana as it relates to “jointly-authored and jointly-owned work,” the insurer said Friday. 

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Miami based rapper Fly Havana

Fly Havana accused Fat Joe of denying him credit and compensation  for his contributions to the “All the Way Up” track. But Joe claims he paid Fly Havana $5,000 in exchange for the release of all his claims to the work.

Fat Joe, believes the lawsuit falls squarely under the insurance agreement providing coverage for “infringement and is suing for breach of contract, breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing against Homeland. He is also seeking declaratory relief. He believes Homeland should face punitive damages “sufficient to punish it and deter similar conduct in the future.”

 

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